100 Lovely Things

At the end of a hard day, when work has been frantic, when things don’t go as plan, and frustration mounts I try to remember why I do this wonderful, challenging, stressful, sad, rewarding vocation!

So! I want to make a list of 100 lovely things about being an OT and remind myself and all of you why it is such a great thing to be an OT!

Feel free to add in comments / make suggestions for this section with your own experiences!

1: “The best Occupational Therapy on Earth”

2: “Random hugs from patients and families”

3: “A well written clinical notes entry”

4: “Teaching”

5: “Learning”

6: “Patient stories”

7: Update: ‘The best occupational therapy on earth’

8: “When an over toilet frame can change someone’s life!”

9: “Occupation is everything and everywhere”

10: “Your work family”

11: “Runaway shower hoses, wet shoes and other OT related mishaps!”

12 – 13: “Suggestions from readers”

14: “Conferences”

15: “The spirits are everywhere, the are right here, between you and me”

16: “The bitter-sweet moments of connection”

10 thoughts on “100 Lovely Things”

  1. Thanks for reminding me that wondering, frustrating , challenging and rewarding can all be part of the same fabulous occupational therapist role.

  2. Deep connections. As a MH OT, many people express feeling like we get them on a deeper level, and that in itself creates positive change.

  3. We can’t change the world but able to make a difference to someone’s world by doing what we’re trained for… Problem solving ❤️

  4. Learning what my geriatric patients did for a living or what their interests were in their earlier lives.
    If you listen to what the geriatric patients’ life lessons are, you may also benefit.

  5. I love this! Thanks for sharing!

    This made me think of two of my favorite OT moments…

    Helping a client get funding for a power w/c and having them say months later “you gave me my legs”

    Doing the swallowing assessment when a clients diet recommendation changed from “nothing by mouth” to “puréed solids and honey thick fluids” and having her husband of 50 years cry in gratitude that she can eat again

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